Monday, August 20, 2012

Rusty Bits, Bones, Teeth & New Work

While visiting Colorado (I wish I lived there.) I got to
poke around at the site of a long gone lumber mill.
I'm not sure yet what to do with the wonderful rusty pieces.
I'm thinking of scrubbing them with a wire brush to remove the loose bits... 
and then trying patina...or what about firing some enamel 
on them? Will that work? Who knows? Do you have any
input on that?  I'd love to try it.
The rusty photos were taken with Hipstmatic on
my iPhone. I love the grungy look.
These are some of my favorite pieces.




And another new addition to my work bench is this great
piece of steel rail that belonged to my Dad. It doesn't have the curved
end of an anvil, but I'm still very happy to have it as I
think it will allow for some great pounding....to
remove frustration if nothing else. 


Oh I think I forgot to mention that we also found some bones
in Colorado. I'm wondering if they can be sliced and
made into beads of sort. Anyone know? 
Wouldn't it be fun to get them sliced up into disks
and soaked in something to add patina...etc....


And finally, here's some new work with some of my new stash. 

Chunky Red Bamboo Coral Beads

These bamboo coral beads have been dyed red. They are large and chunky, but very smooth.
And between each chunky bead is a disk bead of the same material. Added for interest
and contrast is a huge, chunky, turquoise bead.

Altered Clasp
I'm trying to use up all my pre-made clasps, ear wires, etc. so I can begin using only hand made ones.
Here, I've used a planishing hammer on the clasp, sanded both the clasp & sterling beads to add
a brushed finish and then added patina with LOS.

Finally, the Water Buffalo Teeth!
The teeth have been strung with (what I believe to be) black coconut heishi beads. I've had them
for years & am not 100% certain about them. Also thrown into the mix is a very old brass bicone bead
...and I can't recall what that orangy, rusty colored one is. So there you have it! 

I've also pounded, sanded and added patina to the clasp on this one.





You used Animal Teeth on a necklace??!??


Yes.
Yes I did.
Carpe Diem!
-L

9 comments:

Alice said...

Great rusty finds! I see a lot on my walks but am afraid to use such rusty piece for fear the rust will come off and ruin an outfit.

I love the chunky necklace.

Kimberly said...

Looks like you had a good rustabout there. I just mailed myself a flat rate box of rusty bits from Maine myself. I know that you can lampwork onto the rusty metal because I have been doing so. I also know that with the bigger chunks it has to be glowing red hot for the glass to stick. I'm really not sure about the enamel though. It seems as though we would be seeing more iron pieces that are enameled if that were the case.
Make sure to wear a dust mask if you'll be creating any bone dust. I know that's not good to breathe.
I just know you'll come up with some wonderful way to use your pieces. I dig the water buffalo teeth they have such a rich aged look to them.
Kudos to you for retiring your pre-made clasps and making your own.
The caption on the monkey ought to be "See no anvil"

PipnMolly said...

What fun you've had gathering all the rusty crusty !! Love the steel rail. I have a piece myself and find it very useful. The water buffalo teeth are beautiful. More kudos on the making your own.

Juliette Williams said...

just fantastic pieces, and the rusty finds? Wow. Absolutely incredible things you're making!! xoxo Juliette

Lela said...

I agree about the rust being bad, Alice. Whatever happens to them...they'll be sealed if I use them.

Lela said...

Thanks, Kimberly...all very good advice. I probably won't be trying the enameling right away..I've got too many other irons in the fire. So to speak. ;)

Ha! on the monkey caption. :-D

Lela said...

Hi Tracy! I got to use the 'anvil' today & really love it. Plus I like the rough texture it has...something very time worn and comfy about it.

Lela said...

Thanks so much, Juliette. Your visits are always appreciated!

Laura said...

I am so jealous of your rusty crusty metal finds. You know Keith Lo Bue's work, right? I would check him out for some inspiration.